Barcode Examples

A barcode, consisting of bars and spaces, is a machine-readable representation of numerals and characters. Barcode is an optical machine-readable representation of data, which can be read by a barcode reader. Barcodes are widely used for inventory management and tracking applications. A barcode system usually consists of an encoder that generates the bitmap image in a format such as DataMatrix or QR Code, one or more symbols to represent data values (such as letters, digits), and one ore more lines within the bars to encode information about the type of data represented by each symbol.

In this post, I will be providing you with a list of barcode examples that are commonly used in everyday life. From supermarket coupons to store loyalty cards, these barcodes can be found everywhere and make our lives easier.

Barcode Examples

Following are some examples of 1D barcodes in different format. The data is random so the barcode might not be correct.

What is Barcode?

It is an information storage and retrieval method in the form of a series of lines (barcodes) drawn on the products. Barcodes are used to identify products traceability, which is a particularly important task due to the fact that any production defect can lead to significant complications. The main purpose for maintaining this system is to be able to track down problems with quality as soon as possible after their occurrence, thereby minimizing losses associated with them.

At some point we would like to connect our warehouse management software with SAP where do you see possibilities? When I read your article I thought about it especially because like me most of us at one time or another were working on ERP databases so we know what capabilities they have when interfaced with other systems. It’s quite hard to say. Theoretically it is possible no doubt, but I have not personally seen any companies working in this direction. Perhaps there are some, but the systems themselves do not allow you as an end user to do much or they apply a lot of limits that make such integration very difficult.

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